10.01.14

In the age of “reality” shows like Antiques Roadshow and Pawn Stars, when appraisers are minor celebrities and every grandmother’s attic seems to contain at least one semi-precious vase or imposter impressionist, it often appears as if determining the worth of a thing – any thing – takes little more than a quick once-over by the right person. But what we don’t see on television, says Nancy Whipple of Edgartown, is that behind every show host making grand pronouncements about a piece’s value (or lack thereof) is a bank of computers.

Alexandra Bullen Coutts

10.01.14

It started at Thanksgiving. Peggy Ehrenkranz, then eighty-three-years-old, and her twin children, Katherine and Doug, gathered with their families from various parts of the country to celebrate the holiday at Katherine’s home in McLean, Virginia. They all would have preferred to be coming together at their beloved Vineyard family camp at Makonikey, a two-structure rustic compound on one and a half acres with sweeping views of Vineyard Sound and the Elizabeth Islands that has been in the family for sixty-four years. But itwas simply too small.

Alexandra Bullen Coutts

07.01.14

With the Gay Head Light at the edge of the cliff, Vineyarders are celebrating, and angling to save, the beloved red-and-white-flashing beacon at the Island’s western tip.

04.01.14

They are not typical year-round homes; they’re more like well-appointed summer dwellings. Nor are they stylistically similar. But Seaview in Aquinnah and the Corduroy House in West Tisbury share one remarkable feature: in a day when the cost of new construction on the Island regularly runs to $400 or more per square foot, both were built for less than $200 per square foot.  

Joyce Wagner

04.01.14

With a historic Chilmark house slated for a full restoration this fall, we went looking for what remains of 350 years of home design.

Remy Tumin

04.01.14

With the coastal bluff eroding, two things were obvious. The old house near the edge of the scarp was doomed, and any new structure built there had to be easily movable. Working with clients whose family have owned the land for decades, architect Peter Rose came up with the idea of little boxes made not of ticky-tacky but of ten-inch-thick concrete. We caught up with him recently at the property.

MVM: Why concrete?

10.01.13

You might want to think twice about where you put that coffee table.

Geoff Currier

10.01.13

James Sanfilippo of Aquinnah is an artisan specialty plasterer.

Simone McCarthy

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