03.01.15

The land had been a gift outright, from architect Celia Imrey’s step-grandfather William B. Dinsmore to her grandmother, Lesley, on their wedding day in 1947. Fifty-two acres of spectacular real estate on Edgartown harbor, which Imrey today modestly describes as “an interesting piece of ground,” advancing out to the edge of the bluffs and then gently leading back down. Along with the land came a five-bedroom house, and Lesley Dinsmore christened the property “Witchwood,” because she thought the woods surrounding it “looked like witches lived there.” In the 1980s the parcel was subdivided.

Monica Jensen

03.01.15

Steve Spofford’s latest career began with an internet photo gone viral.

03.01.15

Tucked in the dunes off Moshup Trail is a sleek residence inspired by driftwood and lifeguard stands. But as architect Mark Hutker and builder Andrew Flake explain, the house called Duin Huis is anything but simple.

10.10.14

Back in 2002, architect Kate Warner set a goal for all of Martha’s Vineyard: install 500 rooftop solar arrays by 2010. Twelve years later, 223 photovoltaic systems have received state rebates for solar systems or are registered for the solar certificates program. Another two dozen were installed before these two programs were in place, estimates from Rob Meyers of South Mountain Company in West Tisbury.

Olivia Hull

10.10.14

Homeowners go solar on the Vineyard to save the planet and to save money. For Llewellyn Rogers, the priority was reducing his electric bill. In less than four months he saved more thna $1,000 on electricity costs.

Olivia Hull

10.04.14

Once, long ago, I fell in love with a house and then I fell in love with the man who built it.

Rebecca Busselle

10.02.14

After twenty years of focusing on her Vineyard Haven gallery, Nancy Shaw Cramer is ready to take a step back.

Nicole Grace Mercier

10.02.14

Let’s break it down by the numbers. Types of chair styles produced by Vineyard Teak: 87. Tables: 96. Benches: 42. Loungers: 20. Accessories: 76. Number of miles that Island native Whitney Brush travels to Indonesia to manufacture each piece: roughly 10,000. That may stretch the limits of the “local” imprimatur, but Brush brings his Island sensibility to his craft, even from afar.

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