07.01.15

Go figure. During the summer, we are so busy on the farm that I barely get a chance to go anywhere. And then, when I do, where do I go but to another farm, just up the street from me!

By Susie Middleton

06.18.15

A rose by any other name? The bright orange-red fruits of the flowering Rosa rugosa plant have been called many things: beach tomatoes, beach plums (incorrectly), and in their native Japan, shore eggplants. High in Vitamin C and iron, they were once used to ward off scurvy, but today are commonly used in jellies, liqueurs, and teas.

06.18.15

A gin and tonic is lovely and a glass of Provençal rosé can be delightful. But let’s face it, when the thermometer begins to hit summer highs, there is nothing as cooling as a frosty mug of beer. Perhaps that’s why beer is one of the world’s oldest beverages.

By Jessica B. Harris

05.01.15

Farm-to-table. Locavore. Seasonal. Organic. Heirloom. These are terms that have been driving cutting-edge food and enriching the culinary vocabulary in the past few decades. Before then? Not so much.

By Florence Fabricant

05.01.15

With the first crocuses behind us and the passing of mud season, our thoughts turn to warmer weather. In the bar as in the wardrobe, it’s time to pivot from the heavier items that sate in the cold months to spring and summer’s lighter offerings.

By Jessica B. Harris

05.01.15

There’s no conspiracy or anything – in fact, people will be happy to tell you if you ask. It’s just that some of the best food on the Vineyard is hidden. You need to find the back door, or the side door, or the dirt driveway with no sign. Timing is everything, too. If you want Back Door Donuts or Chilmark Chocolates or armfuls of wild watercress and bucketfuls of mussels, you need to know what hour, what day, and what season to go hunting for them.

By Susie Middleton

03.01.15

What if the secret to happiness lay right outside your kitchen door? In a pretty little garden, full of delicious things to eat. It might sound far-fetched to suggest that a kitchen garden can relieve stress, lift your mood, and even ease depression, but new studies suggest there’s a scientific basis – perhaps even a soil bacterium that elevates serotonin – for the pleasure we can get from digging in the dirt.

By Susie Middleton

12.11.14

The food processor does an excellent (and easy) job of cutting butter into flour to yield an ultimately ultra-flaky pastry dough.

By Susie Middleton

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