It may be the most cryptic and intriguing memorial to an individual on Martha’s Vineyard, located in what may be the prettiest setting.

Tom Dunlop

Despite the prominent sign pointing toward Menemsha’s Dutcher Dock, the source of the name is a mystery to most visitors and residents.

Tom Dunlop

The new book Jaws: Memories from Martha’s Vineyard takes a behind-the-scenes look at the 1974 filming of the greatest shark movie ever, often from the perspective of Island residents who were there. The film’s Fourth of July beach sequence – a.k.a. the end of Alex Kintner – involved coordinating hundreds of extras in unpredictable and inhospitable weather, as this excerpt from the book attests.

Matt Taylor

To survey relics from the whole history of Edgartown harbor these days, you need only travel to a dive shop on the south side of Oak Bluffs.

Tom Dunlop

The Norton Point inlet seems to have an inherently contrary nature. People want it open when it’s not, and they want it closed when it’s open. But when they try to take matters into their own hands, nature has won every time but one.

Tom Dunlop

Since the Patriots Day storm of 2007, the breakthrough at Norton Point beach has caused powerful currents to surge through Edgartown harbor, and substantial erosion along Chappy’s south shore. This feat of nature has happened before and will surely happen again – perhaps more dramatically.

Tom Dunlop

The Oscar-winning actor was one of the first celebrity residents on the Vineyard, and today his former Chilmark homestead retains its charming rural character.

Karla Araujo

Armor. Battle. Punishment. Malicious attacks. These terms come up over and over again in the Martha’s Vineyard Magazine archives. They describe an open-ended war being fought on Vineyard soil, and this time the enemy is not Nantucket – there is far more at stake than a bronze cup. What we are fighting for is our home, and the enemy is Mother Nature – a worthy opponent.

Linley Dolby

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