10.01.15

Got eggs?” If you were a farmer with a farm stand on Martha’s Vineyard this summer, that just might have been the question you dreaded most from customers. Because (though you may remember the summer of 2015 somewhat differently than I in years to come), it actually was the Summer of the Great Vineyard Egg Shortage, as one of our customers put it to me.

Susie Middleton

09.01.15

It’s an ancient rite of late summer, dating back to long before the arrival of Europeans in the Americas. In a good year, typically around the first week of September, on coastal plains and dunes on Martha’s Vineyard and throughout New England, dozens of small, tart fruits dangle from the branches of the beach plum plant and are gathered by those who know a good thing when they taste it and are lucky enough to know a good patch for picking.

Catherine Walthers

09.01.15

More. I always want more. More sea glass, more fireworks, more Menemsha sunsets, more fair food, more summer. I know I sound like a small child with a bad case of the “I wants,” but at least I am honest about my hedonism. There’s a reason I live on Martha’s Vineyard after all; simple pleasures are never far beyond the grasp of my sticky fingers.

Susie Middleton

09.01.15

For some, weddings may mean champagne toasts and lengthy best man’s speeches, but for old-school folks, it’s all about the punch.

Jessica B. Harris

07.01.15

Go figure. During the summer, we are so busy on the farm that I barely get a chance to go anywhere. And then, when I do, where do I go but to another farm, just up the street from me!

Susie Middleton

06.18.15

A rose by any other name? The bright orange-red fruits of the flowering Rosa rugosa plant have been called many things: beach tomatoes, beach plums (incorrectly), and in their native Japan, shore eggplants. High in Vitamin C and iron, they were once used to ward off scurvy, but today are commonly used in jellies, liqueurs, and teas.

Where to look: Close to the ocean, near dunes and beach paths. Rosa rugosa is easily identified by bright white and pink flowers that begin to bloom in June; rose hips begin to ripen in July.

06.18.15

A gin and tonic is lovely and a glass of Provençal rosé can be delightful. But let’s face it, when the thermometer begins to hit summer highs, there is nothing as cooling as a frosty mug of beer. Perhaps that’s why beer is one of the world’s oldest beverages. Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archeology Project for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages, and Health at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, has traced the earliest confirmed barley beer to the central Zagros Mountains of Iran and dated it to c. 3,400–3,000 B.C.

Jessica B. Harris

05.01.15

Farm-to-table. Locavore. Seasonal. Organic. Heirloom. These are terms that have been driving cutting-edge food and enriching the culinary vocabulary in the past few decades. Before then? Not so much.

Florence Fabricant

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