Sections

4.25.12

Spring Into Summer

The Island sheds her winter cocoon in May and June. Nascent summer weather livens the tempo in the towns and outdoors – the fish start to bite, the flora to bloom, and the ferry to bustle. Hibernation is ceding quickly to congregation, but it’s still possible to find parking in Edgartown. Or at the cliffs. Time to go enjoy the Island, so here are five ideas to get you out the door.

1. Make a pit stop in OB. The Oak Bluffs Arts District has a new kid on the block: the Pit Stop Workshop Company, a music venue and community space for all things art. With a gallery, live performances almost every night, and various workshops during the day, the Pit Stop is a hive of artistic activity and a chill spot to jam out or tune in. Membership costs between $100 and $150, and the benefits include special events, half-price tickets, and the ability to make reservations. Tickets can also be purchased at the door. For what’s going on, see the Pit Stop’s Facebook page; for membership, e-mail thepitstopworkshop@gmail.com.

2. Grab your rod and reel. The weather is heating up and so is the action in the water, as striped bass and bluefish swim to our shores starting in early May. Gear up and hit the beach for surfcasting or fly-fishing, or hire a charter for some inshore fishing and the inside skinny on where they’re biting. With a little luck, you’ll be filleting stripers in no time.

3. Bloomsday on stage. On June 16, 1904, protagonist Leopold Bloom took a walk through Dublin, immortalized in James Joyce’s novel Ulysses. Throughout the world, June 16 has become a celebration of the Irish author’s work. On-Island, Bloomsday is honored in a night of performances directed by John Crelan at the Katharine Cornell Theatre in Vineyard Haven. Live Irish and Victorian music is woven together with dramatic scenes and monologues from Joyce’s literature to create an evening that – like the works of the man himself – is both funny and poignant. Tickets at the door for $15; show starts at 8 p.m.

4. Catching fleas. The Island’s flea markets transform unassuming, empty fields into an eclectic smorgasbord of vintage finds, retro do-dads, and art,