12.01.06

When Ronni Simon gets dressed, she doesn’t wear much jewelry – usually just her watch and maybe some hoop earrings, plus the rings she wears all the time because she can’t get them off her fingers anymore. “I’ve never really been into jewelry,” she confesses. Which is why no one is more surprised than Ronni herself at the overnight success of the jewelry-making business she started just over half a year ago.

By Laura D. Roosevelt

12.01.06

I am a fashion leader.   Except that I’m really not. I’m not even a contender. So the fact that I recently received a letter that said, “You are a fashion leader,” made me particularly pleased. Unfortunately, my elevated fashion credentials don’t really belong to me at all. The true fashion leader is a woman I don’t know. I’ll call her Katherine M.   

By Kate Feiffer

12.01.06

A fashion statement, a political statement. Stina Sayre wants to make them at the same time, but it’s not easy. Her political statement goes like this: “We’re so globalized,” she says. “It’s like nothing is made in the Western world anymore. We westerners don’t understand where our things come from. But when you go to Wal-Mart, the jeans you buy are made by slaves, pretty much. You can buy a pair of pants for $25, but the person who made them doesn’t make a buck an hour.

By Mike Seccombe

12.01.06

No one knows for certain who the first person was to create scrimshaw; however, chances are his inspiration came not so much from a creative muse as it did from a state of boredom. According to Tom DeMont, owner of Edgartown Scrimshaw, scrimshaw originated on American whaling ships in the 1700s. Because whaling was so dangerous, men were unable to work at night, and scrimshaw became a way for them to occupy their idle hours.

By Geoff Currier

09.01.06

Dear Summer Person: Goodbye. Fear not, this is not a good-riddance letter. I’ve lived on the Vineyard year-round for eight short years and still relish the Island summer and the people who come with it.

By Kate Feiffer

09.01.06

(With apologies to Billy Joel’s Piano Man): It’s nine o’clock on a Wednesday mornThe regular crowd’s shuffled inWe’re fifteen strong in the Mansion House poolTrying to work off our tonic and gin Well, Leslie C. Grimm is a friend of oursShe teaches aerobics for allBe it stretching or strength’ning or    pumping the heartEveryone’s having a ball Splash, splash-splash, de de splashSplash splash de de splash splash splash

By Jim Kaplan

09.01.06

Most people think of wampum as the Native American form of money, but Berta and Vernon Welch of Aquinnah turn that old chestnut on its head. For the past ten years the Welches have worked as master jewelers, helping revive and modernize the ancient craft of wampum making. Their children Sophia, sixteen, and Giles, twenty, join them in the work, which takes a great deal of time and effort.

By Brooks Robards

09.01.06

The Revolutionary War was not one of Martha’s Vineyard’s shining moments. Unable to persuade authorities in Boston that it held any strategic value, the Island felt exposed and undefended from the start of the war to its finish and was reluctant to take sides, lest it wind up fighting for the losers. But neutrality did not protect it from invasion.

By Max Hart

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